10 Houses That Generate More Energy Than They Consume

Houses that generate more energy than they consume

Your future home may not have to pay electricity bills, even help you make money by selling the excess. The houses that generate more energy than they consume appear every day in greater numbers around the world. These homes are demonstrating the viability of renewable energy in domestic installations. In this article we collect 9 houses that can produce more energy than they need, some so efficient that they can even power the house of the next door neighbor.

  1. Solcer, the home of Phil Jones. Cardiff University.
  2. Heliotrope, by Ralph Disch.
  3. ZEB pilot house by Snøhetta in Norway.
  4. Positive House in Australia by ArchiBlox.
  5. Cannon Beach Residence by Nathan Good Architects.
  6. Home for life by AART architects.
  7. B10 Aktivhaus by Werner Sobek.
  8. E + Roxbury Townhomes by Interface Studio Architects.
  9. House with sea containers.
  10. Passive House of Lark Rise.

Solcer, the home of Phil Jones. Cardiff University.

Solcer, the home of Phil Jones.  Cardiff University

The first house that can generate more energy than it consumes in Britain, the Solcer House generates enough solar energy even to have excess energy to return eight to the grid. Phil Jones of Cardiff University and his team designed a three-bedroom home, which cost approximately $195,000.

Heliotrope, by Ralph Disch.

Germany Solar5 neighborhood

An impressive energy positive solar home in the Freiburg neighborhood, Germany, a neighborhood that generates 4 times more energy than it consumes. The house rotates 180 degrees to follow the sun and maximize the efficiency of the solar panel. A 6.6 kWh rooftop solar installation. Solar energy is also used to heat the water and radiators in the house. Designed by architect Ralph Disch, the revolving house can generate up to five times more energy than it consumes. It also includes a rainwater recycling system.

ZEB pilot house by Snøhetta in Norway.

ZEB Pilot House by Snøhetta in Norway

A positive energy family home that produces enough energy that in addition to the home it can power an electric car all year round. Located in Larvik, Norway, the 200-square-meter house serves as a pilot project to facilitate learning. It is powered by rooftop solar energy and geothermal energy.

Positive house in Australia by ArchiBlox.

Heralded as Australia

Australia’s first positive energy house, a prefab house topped by a solar panel that produces more energy than it consumes. Designed by ArchiBlox, the 75-square-meter house takes in abundant natural light through a double-glazed facade and topped by a green roof, the walls of which are lined with vertical gardens to enhance insulation and provide shade.

Cannon Beach Residence by Nathan Good Architects.

Cannon Beach Residence by Nathan Good Architects

A house with a green roof that also has a spectacular view of the ocean. Located in Cannon Beach, Oregon, the three-bedroom home generates its own power using a combination of photovoltaics, solar water heaters, geothermal energy, heat recovery fans, and a high-efficiency heat pump.

Home for life by AART architects.

Home For Life by AART Architects

A modern two-bedroom, 200-square-meter home that is filled with natural light strategically used to save 50% on heating in winter. It includes a photovoltaic system, a solar hot water system, a heat pump, energy optimized windows and an automatic natural ventilation system.

B10 Aktivhaus by Werner Sobek.

B10 Aktivhaus by Werner Sobek

Architectural firm Werner Sobek designed a positive energy home that produces enough clean energy to power not only itself, but two electric cars, as well as the house next door. The 85-square-meter house has a smart energy system that can be controlled remotely via smartphone or tablet and is programmed to “learn” and adapt to the habits of the homeowners. The rooftop photovoltaic installation produces around 8,300 kilowatt-hours of solar energy per year.

E + Roxbury Townhomes by Interface Studio Architects.

Roxbury E + townhouses by Interface Studio Architects

Positive energy houses don’t have to be isolated houses, this is the case of the Roxbury E + townhouses, a group of positive energy townhouses in Boston, Massachusetts. The LEED Platinum certification for these homes is each topped off with 39 solar panels that can produce around 10,000 kilowatts a year. The owners have the opportunity to sell the excess energy to the city grid.

An amazing house made with shipping containers.

Surrounded by lush vegetation, with a steel frame, a bamboo facade, a rainwater collection system and a green roof with solar panels.

Passive House of Lark Rise.

It produces 2 times more energy in a year than it consumes, getting 97% less energy from the grid than the average UK home and exporting 10 times more energy than it imports from the grid.

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